Books and Papers about Chaucer published in Korea
Last updated April 5, 2014



Books



1. Korean Translations of Chaucer's Works

1. (This partial translation is now superseded by the complete version number 3 below)
켄터베리 이야기  I
제프리 초서 지음
이동일. 이동춘 옮김
서울, 한울 출판사 2001
ISBN 89-460-2840-8
Geoffrey Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales I
Translated by Lee, Dongill and Lee, Dong-Ch'un
Seoul, Korea; Hanwool Publishing. 2001

Contains: Korean-language Introduction; Korean prose translations of General Prologue; Knight's Tale; Miller's Tale; The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale; The Clerk's Tale; The Franklin's Tale; The Pardoner's Prologue and Tale

2.
트로일루스와 크라세이드
제프리 초서
김재환 옮김
서울, 까치출판사 2001
ISBN 89-7291-285-9 03840
Geoffrey Chaucer: Troilus and Criseyde
Translated by Kim, Jae-Hwan
Seoul, Korea; Kkach'i Publishing. 2001

Contains: Korean verse translation of Troilus and Criseyde; Korean-language Introduction

3.
켄터베리 이야기
제프리 초서 지음
이동일. 이동춘 옮김
서울, 한국외국어대학교 출판부 2007  672 pages
ISBN 978-89-7464-445-1
Geoffrey Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales
Translated by Lee, Dongill and Lee, Dong-Ch'un
Seoul, Korea; Hangook University of Foreign Studies Press. 2007

Contains: the complete text of the Canterbury Tales, with the poetry translated as poetry, prose as prose.




2. Editions and book-length studies of Chaucer's works published in Korea

1.
초서의켄터베리 이야기 대한 텍스트 비평
안선재. 이동춘
서울대학교출판사 2002
ISBN 89-521-0372-6
Textual Criticism of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
edited by An, Sonjae and Lee, Dong-Ch'un
Seoul: Seoul National University Press. 2002

Contains the Middle-English texts of The General Prologue, The Miller's Tale, The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale, The Pardoner's Prologue and Tale, The Nun's Priest's Tale with a general introduction, specific introductions to each tale, with short notes and longer explanatory notes, all in Korean, as well as English texts of a variety of sources and analogues, with a short glossary.

2.

제프리 초서의 문학세계
김재환 지음
서울, 소화출판사  2002
ISBN 89-8410-224-5
The Literary World of Geoffrey Chaucer
by Kim, Jae-Hwan
Seoul: So Wha Publishing Company 2002
(Hallym University series 97)

In Korean. Chapter headings: The writer and his age; the poet's craft; the shorter poems; Chaucer and Italy; The Canterbury Tales

3.

캔터베리 이야기 연구

김재환 지음

서울, 소화출판 사 2004

ISBN 89-8410-257-1

A Study on the Canterbury Tales

by Kim, Jae-Hwan

Seoul: So Wha Publishing Company  2004

 

In Korean.
Section headings:

Preface

Section 1. The author and the work

Chapter 1. Overall structures (I. structure,  II. genre, III. narrative)  Chapter 2. Authorial attitudes (I. Politics II. Marriage III.Science) 

Section 2. Analysis of the work

Chapter 1. New Critical approaches (I. Irony, II. Parody)  Chapter 2. Post-New Critical approaches (I. Deconstructionism II. Queer theory)

Books consulted

Index.



Articles



1. Articles published in the Journal of English Language and Literature since 1989
(the journal of the English Language and Literature Association of Korea)

(as listed in the Online Chaucer Bibliography)


1. Author: Shynne, Gwanghyun.
Title: "The Allegory of the 'Retraction' and the Retraction of Allegory."
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature 42 (1996): 3-21.
Summary: The allegory of ParsPT assumes that literature can somehow represent truth, while the theology of ParsPT emphasizes the impossibility of humanity's comprehending such truth. Ret espouses a mediating negative allegory that indicates divine ineffability and thereby equates secular and sacred poetries as limited--and equivalent--means to truth.
In Korean with English abstract.


2. Author: Park, Sae-gon.
Title: The Transition from the Impersonal to the Personal Construction in English--with Reference to Data Analysis of the Sentences that Contain Infinitives."
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature 41 (1995): 827-45
Summary: Draws examples from "Beowulf" and CT to demonstrate transition in impersonal constructions in the Middle English period, especially evident in uses of the expletive "it" with an infinitive ("It happed hym to ride").
In Korean with English abstract.
Subjects: Language and Word Studies.


3. Author: Moon, Hi Kyung.
Title: "Chaucer's 'Clerk's Tale': A Disrupted Exemplum."
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature (Korea) 40 (1994): 643-55
Summary: Chaucer's sympathy toward women is questionable, given the context of ClT and Walter's dominance over Griselda. This uncertainty is perpetuated by the double narrative of CT, which presents the "Tale" through the voice of a fictional storyteller as well as the voice of the author. It is difficult to realize Chaucer's view on feminism since he allows Griselda to maintain her identity while placing her in a submissive and passive role.


4. Author: Kim, Jaewhan.
Title: "Geoffrey Chaucer and the Medieval Science: Centered upon 'Canterbury Tales'."
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature 39 (1993): 249-61.
Summary: Surveys Chaucer's use of astrological, alchemical, and physiognomic details as devices of narration and characterization.
In Korean with English abstract.
Subjects: Background and General Criticism.


5. Author: Kim, Jaewhan.
Title: "The Genre of Canterbury Tales."
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature (Korea) 38 (1992): 213-27.
Summary: Examines the polyphonic aspects of CT, following the theory of Bakhtin; regards CT as serio-comic and carnivalesque.
Subjects: Canterbury Tales--General.


6. Author: Kong, Sung-Uk.
Title: "Chaucer's 'The House of Fame" as a Self-Reflexive Poem.'"
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature (Korea) 38 (1992): 437-52.
Summary: In HF, Chaucer criticizes incompetent poets for pursuing fame, claiming fame for himself as a true poet.
In Korean, with English abstract.
Subjects: House of Fame.


7. Author: Kang, Du-Hyoung.
Title: "The Problem of Tragedy in 'The Canterbury Tales.'"
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature (Korea) 37 (1991): 825-41.
Summary: NPT subverts the idea of tragedy reflected in MkT, and KnT counterpoints its tragic view of fate. Diverse and comprehensive in his outlook, Chaucer is not content with a simple formula.
Subjects: Monk and His Tale. Nun's Priest and His Tale. Knight and His Tale.


8. Author: Park, Doo-byung.
Title: "A Study of the Final -e in Chaucer."
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature (Korea) 37 (1991): 761-82.
Summary: Compares several theories of Middle English pronunciation, arguing that Chaucer's rhymes require pronunciation of final -e
In Korean with English abstract.
Subjects: Style and Versification.


9. Author: Kim, Jong-Hwan.
Title: "Dramatic Irony in Chaucer's 'The Franklin's Tale'."
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature (Korea) 35 (1989): 3-12.
Summary: Dramatic irony in FranT and FranP results in incongruities between the characters' appearances and their absurdities, also demonstrating the Franklin's ill-claimed eloquence and acquaintance with rhetoric.
Subjects: Franklin and His Tale.


10. Author: Lee, Dong-Chun
Title: "Chaucer's Wife of Bath's Tale: Female Sexuality Confined in a Prison of Language."
Published: Journal of English Language and Literature (Korea) 48 (2002): 263-87
Summary: By calling his narrator's trustworthiness into question through his story-telling devices that he learned from his literary predecessors, Chaucer offers his audience the chance of relying on judicious and thoughtful independence of mind in sorting out the complex messages within a narrative.
In Korean with English abstract. Link to full Korean text.
Subjects: Wife of Bath’s Tale; sources of; narratorial strategies in; use of popular materials in.


2. Chaucer-related articles published in Medieval English Studies
(The journal of the Medieval English Studies Association of Korea)



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 1 (1993)
 

Teague, Anthony.
Romantic Love as Fiction and as Life.
Medieval English Studies Volume 1 (1993) 21-41
English
Summary: Surveys the development of love from the troubadors and the 12th century romances, through the 'real-life' experiences represented by Dante, then Petrarch, as far as the complexities of Chaucer's Troilus and Crisseyde

Lee, Sung-il.
Chaucer and Dreams: The Book of the Duchess.
Medieval English Studies Volume 1 (1993) 43-58
Korean with English abstract
Summary: The Book of the Duchess seen as "metapoetry",

Lim, Hye-Soon.
The Mirror Image on "The Friar's Tale and "The Summoner's Tale."
Medieval English Studies Volume 1 (1993) 59-75
Korean with English abstract.
Summary: Explores how the two tales, while being expressions of the mutual antagonism between the two pilgrims, each reflect the moral degeneracy of their tellers.

Kim, Jae-Whan.
Chaucer's View of Marriage: Centered on "the Franklin's Tale."
Medieval English Studies Volume 1 (1993) 77-93
Korean with English abstract.
Summary: Through the tale Chaucer tries to show that the vision of the idealistic marriage cannot be realized without dialectical processes between the present and the idealistic perspective.

Park, Young-Bae.
Linguistic Diversity in Chaucer's Language.
Medieval English Studies Volume 1 (1993) 95-112
Korean with English abstract.
Summary: The linguistic 'diversite' of 14th-century London English provides Chaucer with the means he needed for his literary work.



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 2 (1994)
 

Kong, Sung-Uk.
Chaucer's The Legend of Good Women: A Self-Apology.
Medieval English Studies Volume 2 (1994) 41-57
Korean with English abstract.
Summary: Chaucer's self-apologetic and self-reflexive aspects as an artist are revealed by a comparison of the two Prologues of the Legend.

Kim, Jae-Whan.
The Parody on the Courtly Love: "the Knight's Tale" and "the Miller's Tale."
Medieval English Studies Volume 2 (1994) 59-77
Korean with English abstract.
Summary: The "Miller's Tale" could be read as a parody of the "Knight's Tale" and vice versa. The accomplishments of the one could be better understood when it is read as a foil of the other.



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 3 (1995)
 

Lim, Hye-Soon.
A Study on Chaucer's Use of Loan-Words.
Medieval English Studies Volume 3 (1995) 61-85
Korean with English abstract.
Summary: Chaucer uses loan-words of Norse, Latin, and French origins, as devices to heighten the literary effect of various genres.

Kim, Hoyoung.
The Literary Context of The House of Fame and Chaucer's Via Negativa.
Medieval English Studies Volume 3 (1995) 87-102
English.
Summary: The House of Fame is deeply concerned with the source, function, and limit of poetry. In it, Chaucer uses a via negativa in whihc he attains truth by questioning the possibility of attaining truth. It enables him to realize how shaky a foundation his poetry is based on, yet prepares him for the great achievement of Troilus.

Kim, Myoung-ok.
Studies in Medieval Literary Theory.
Medieval English Studies Volume 3 (1995) 128-145
Korean.
Summary: Relates The Canterbury Tales to various medieval concepts and criteria concerning poetic theory and literary criticism.



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 4 (1996)
 

Lee, Yon-hui.
Chaucer's Characterization of Criseyde in Troilus and Criseyde.
Medieval English Studies Volume 4 (1996) 73-96
Korean with English abstract.
Summary: Criseyde is sometimes wrongly seen as a simple figure but rather she should be viewed as a complex and realistic representation, with both tragic and comic aspects.

Yoon, Minwoo.
Chaucer's Fabliaux: Fragment I of the Canterbury Tales.
Medieval English Studies Volume 4 (1996) 97-136
Korean
Summary: Explores various readings of the fabliaux, applying criteria from Bakhtin and Lacan.

Lee, Insung.
The Symbolic Meaning of Sea in Chaucer's The Man of Law's Tale.
Medieval English Studies Volume 4 (1996) 137-147
English.
Summary: In this Tale, Chaucer distinguishes between "water," "sea," and "salt sea," and in using the last term seems to follow Biblical conventions in which the "salt sea" is a demonized and deadening reality, essentially malignant.

Lim, Hye-Soon.
Gentil and Free in "the Franklin's Tale".
Medieval English Studies Volume 4 (1996) 149-173
Korean with English abstract.
Summary: The pilgrim Franklin shows concern with the theme of gentilesse in Prologue and Tale. The words 'free' and 'gentil' are almost cognate during the tale, but the term 'gentil' is higher. By using the word 'free' in the final question as to which of the 3 active characters was most 'free' the Franklin betrays a lack of understanding of his own tale.

An, Sonjae
Patterns of Fractured Discourse in Chaucer's Nun's Priest's Tale.
Medieval English Studies Volume 4 (1996) 175-189
English.
Summary: Explores points at which the narrative coherence of NPT breaks down completely and has to begin in a quite new direction, obliging the narrator to backtrack and inviting readers to explore the limits of narrative form.



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 5 (1997)
 

Kim, Jung-Ai.
Gower's Good Women:  Confessio Amantis.
Medieval English Studies Volume 5 (1997) 59-82
Korean.
Summary: The study compares the treatment of the good women of Chaucer and those of Gower. Both writers fail to laud good women because of the preconceived frame of the poems as well as their male-oriented perspective.

Kaylor, Noel Harold, Jr.
The Influence of Boethius and Dante upon Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde.
Medieval English Studies Volume 5 (1997) 83-105
English.
Summary: The rise and fall of Troilus's fortunes is based on the Boethian image of Fortuna's turning wheel but also reflects the movement of Dante's Commedia in the rise to bliss, then reverses that movement as Troilus loses Criseyde and returns back through a Purgatory before ending again in Hell.

Kim, Myoung-ok.
The Medieval Concepts of Poet, Narrator, and Reader Related to the Poet, Narrator, and Reader Found in Chaucer's Poetry.
Medieval English Studies Volume 5 (1997) 107-144
Korean.
Summary: Contrasts Chaucer's use of multiple narratorial voices with the way other medieval writers write themselves and their readers into their texts.

Kang, Ji-Soo.
The (In)Completeness of the Cook's Tale.
Medieval English Studies Volume 5 (1997) 145-170
English.
Summary: The incompleteness of the Cook's Tale is seen in the light of medieval theories of narrative structure and closure / conclusion. It relates to the moral inconclusiveness of the Reeve's Tale and seems almost deliberately to embody a final message on closure and meaning at the end of the First Fragment.

Ch'oi, Ye-jong.
Sermon and Wyclifism in the Wife of Bath.
Medieval English Studies Volume 5 (1997) 171-200
Korean
Summary: Traces links between the Wife of Bath's Prologue and Wyclifism, concluding that the text shows that Chaucer was well aware of the deep significance of Wyclifism and sympathetic toward it.

Lee, Sung-Il.
On Robert Henryson's Testament of Crisseid.
Medieval English Studies Volume 5 (1997) 201-213
English.
Summary: Compares Henryson's story with Chaucer's, stressing the superiority of Chaucer's and finding that Henryson by the time he had finished writing felt a strong dissatisfaction with his own work.



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 6 (1998)

Choi, Yejung
An Apology of Poetry: Chaucer's Poetics in The House of Fame
Medieval English Studies Volume 6 (1998) 131-161
Korean
English abstract.
 

Park, Youngwon
Providence and the Planetary Gods in the Knight's Tale
Medieval English Studies Volume 6 (1998) 163-197
English
English & Korean abstracts.
 

Lim, Hye-Soon
"Glosyng" in the Summoner's Tale
Medieval English Studies Volume 6 (1998)  199-223
Korean
English abstract.



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 7 (1999)

An, Sonjae
The Good, the Bad, and the Holy: Reading the Canterbury Tales
Medieval English Studies Volume 7 (1999)  63-92
English
English & Korean abstracts.
Summary : Chaucer's use of 'worthy' and the many ways in which the Canterbury Tales play with questions of value lead to a reading of the entire work in which the (Second) Nun's Tale of St. Cecilia exemplifies the highest value in human living, that of Holiness.

Kim, Jung-Ai
The Monk's Tale: Chaucerian Tragedy
Medieval English Studies Volume 7 (1999)  93-123
Korean
English & Korean abstracts.
Summary : Although the Monk seems to suggest that the tragedies he tells can all be explained by the action of Fortune, there is no consistant concept of Fortune and the result is a failure.

Park, Yoon-Hee
The Wife of Bath's Taming of Romance
Medieval English Studies Volume 7 (1999)  125-147
Korean
English & Korean abstracts.
Summary : The Wife of Bath's Tale, sometimes felt by critics to betray Chaucer's latent feminism by its harmonious ending, should rather be read as a subversion of traditional male discourse.

Choi, Yejung
The Legend of Good Women: Reading the Author's 'entente'
Medieval English Studies Volume 7 (1999)  149-175
Korean
English & Korean abstracts.
Summary : If the God of Love and Alceste criticize Chaucer, it is as representatives of  a text community based on Augustinian hermeneutics; Chaucer undermines the legitimacy of their view of poetry, inscribing his own presence and intent in the poem.

Na, Yong-jun
"Love, That knetteth lawe of compaingie" in Troilus and Criseyde
Medieval English Studies Volume 7 (1999)  177-197
English
Korean abstract
Summary: Traces Troilus's evolution toward an ever higher understanding of cosmic love.
 



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 8 (2000)

Kaylor, Noel Harold
Holding the Center: Chaucer's Book of Troilus and Dante's Commedia
Medieval English Studies Volume 8 (2000)  95-114
English
English abstract
Summary: Relates the structure of Troilus, where Troilus's happiness reaches its apex it the very center of the poem's line-count, to structures found in Dante's Commedia and to themes of fortune's changes from Boethius.



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 9 (2001) with access to complete texts

No. 1 (June 2001)

Kong, Sung-Uk
The Narrative Structure of The Parliament of Fowls
Medieval English Studies Volume 9.1 (2001)  133-153
Korean
English & Korean abstracts
Summary: Studies the relation between the narrative structure and meaning Chaucer expects to show in The Parliament of Fowls. Chaucer employs different
narrative techniques. Some critics criticize this inconsistency in narration as irrelevancy or an artistic fault. But this narrative inconsistency reflects the author's intention as to the meaning of the poem. Different narrative styles serve as an effective way to reveal his intended meaning in the poem.

No. 2 (December 2001)

Lee, Yeon-Hee
The Duality of Fear of Troilus and Criseyde
Medieval English Studies Volume 9.2 (2001) 
73-105
Korean
English and Korean abstracts
Summary: Studies the two protagonists' fears in Troilus and Criseyde, considering that the fearful character of each of them prepares some principal motives and parts of their activities. This study is focused on how fear is embodied in the character and activity of the two main characters, and produces an effect on the
fortune of both in the poem.



Chaucer-related articles in Medieval English Studies Volume 10 (2002) with access to complete texts

No. 1 (June 2002)

Kang, Chung-Ryong.
Le Roman de la Rose and Chaucer's Translation
Medieval English Studies Volume 10.1 (2002)  73-107
Korean
French and Korean abstracts
Summary: The auhor introduces and summarizes the French poem, and briefly exposes the main characteristics of Chaucer's partial translation.

No. 2 (December 2002)

An, Sonjae
Troilus and Criseyde: The Hidden Influence of Chaucer's Reading
Medieval English Studies Volume 10.2 (2002) 153-168
English
Korean abstract
Summary: Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde can easily be shown to have been influenced by Chaucer's reading of texts by Dante, Petrarch, and Boethius. Chaucer's knowledge of works by Dante and Boethius, and perhaps of Petrarch's Canzoniere, was such that readers who have not read them will be unable to perceive the full complexity of the effect of the echoes of them found in Troilus and Criseyde. Yet Chaucer nowhere indicates what he is doing and the interpretations of his text are rendered the more complex by such secret strategies.
 
 


Chaucer-related articles in Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 11 (2003) with access to complete texts

Volume 11, No. 1 (July 2003)

Moon, Hi Kyung.
"The Legend of False Men"?: Chaucer's Legend of Good Women Re-titled
Medieval
and Early Modern English Studies Volume 11.1 (2003) 117-130
English
Korean abstract
Summary:
Reductiveness and stereotyping that arise from the good women/false men dichotomy cannot be made to fit the complexities of human experience and the very categories of good/bad, true/false, men/women elide and merge as to render the literary task given to the narrator pointless. With the breakdown of these categories, the grand title of the poem, The Legend of Good Women, no longer seems to have any grounds to stand upon. The result is that the work comes to a stall. It can no longer keep up the pretence of being about women nor about goodness. The act of narrating explodes the propaganda of "good women" and "false men," exposing it for what it is, and the reader, who presumably is a better reader than the God, too must decline to read on when he/she finds that he/she too had been taken in by the false title.

 

Volume 11, No. 2 (January 2004) 


Kang, Ji-Soo

계시적 상상력과 역사적 텍스트: 신곡, 진주, 공작 부인 이야기를 중심으로
(
Ji-Soo Kang, Apocalyptic Imagination and Historical Text: A Study of The Divine Comedy, the Book of the Duchess and Pearl)
Medieval
and Early Modern English Studies Volume 11.2 (2003) 243-258
Korean
English abstract

The kind of apocalypse described in Dante's Divina Commedia, Chaucer's Book of the Duchess and the Gawain-poet's Pearl may also be viewed as formal models of ending of literary texts. It is more appropriate to regard the pilgrim's encounter with God in the Paradiso or the final episodes of the dreamers/ narrators in the English works as the staging of an apocalyptic moment. Among the three works discussed, there is also a radical difference among their views of apocalypse as a way of understanding history and temporality. The pilgrim in The Divine Comedy sees God within the poem, within history. This is an apocalypse that is brought into history. The Book of the Duchess and Pearl are about death, loss, and mourning which are direct consequences of the historical and temporal nature of humanity.


Denise Ming-yueh Wang

Order, Freedom, and ‘commune profyt’ in Chaucer's Parlement of Foulys
Medieval
and Early Modern English Studies Volume 11.2 (2003) 283-298
English

English abstract
The dreamer-poet in Chaucer’s Parlement of Foulys was indeed having a vision, but it was a vision that constructed and institutionalized a particular set of values based on intellectual oppositions or conflicting views, for instance, freedom vs. order, consensus vs. dispute,
common profit” vs. “singular profit,” and, particularly, the world we live in vs. the world of words/dreams. The avian world the dreamer-poet constructed was not a means for literary escape from the real.  On the contrary, it was firmly rooted in the “here and now,” constructed from a vantage point of socio-political criticism, and populated by visions of the power of words.


Chung, Inju
 정 인 주
군 주와 시인: 기사이야기의 테세우스와 화자

(The Lord and the Poet: Theseus and the Knight
in The Knight's Tale)
Medieval
and Early Modern English Studies Volume 11.2 (2003) 299-316
Korean

English abstract
 
By presenting Theseus as an ideal knight figure, the narrator attempts to be a good poet who provides a story with both entertainment and moral lesson.  But he also fails to control his own story and thus ultimately is unable to make his work an artistically successful entity.  Paradoxically, however, these narrative failures reflect artistic success for Geoffrey Chaucer as a poet.  By making his characters fail to provide the order and harmony in their roles, Chaucer is refusing an easy solution to the problems of life or a comprehensive answer to the question, "What is this world?"  In The Knight's Tale Chaucer intends to present much more questions and problems than it pretends to provide answers.

 

Chaucer-related articles in Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 12 (2004)

Volume 12, No. 1 (July 2004)


Kim, Myungsook

르네상스영문학과 영어학의 경계 넘기: 초서주의(Chaucerism) 중심으로
(Crossing the Boundaries between Renaissance Literature and Linguistics: A Review of Chaucerism)
Medieval and Early Modern
English Studies Volume 12.1 (2004) 67-84
Korean

English abstract
The lexical approach, the study of the English vocabulary/lexicon, can be extended as one way to cross the boundaries between English literature and linguistics, particularly between Renaissance literature and linguistics. The paper discusses the Inkhorn Controversy in which the borrowing of Latinate words was either approved or opposed during the English Renaissance period. It also reviews Chaucerism, an alternative to the borrowing of Latinate words, suggested by medieval English scholars. Obsolete words from the Chaucerism practiced by medievalizing authors including John Cheke and Edmund Spenser are thoroughly examined in this paper referring to OED, to find out if they have survived in the Present Day English and if there might have been any semantic changes.

 

 

Choi, Yejung and Kang, Ji-Soo 강 지 수  /  최 예 정

각양각색의 사람들이 각양각색으로 이야기했노라”:‘캔터베리 이야기’번역 검토(Diverse folk diversely they seyde”: Korean Translations of The Canterbury Tales)
Medieval and Early Modern
English Studies Volume 12.1 (2004) 225-256
Korean

English abstract 
Since the early 1960s Geoffrey Chaucers Canterbury Tales has been translated in parts or in its entirety into Korean. The four published translations chosen for the purpose of this review paper the translations by J. Kim, B. Song, and Dong-il Lee and Dongchoon Lee are examined according to three criteria: (1) Was the work translated with a historical, cultural and religious understanding of the medieval text?; (2) Does the target text reflect the literary aspect of the source text?; and (3) Does the target text as a whole reflect a consistent philosophy or principle of translation?


 


Volume 12, No. 2 (January 2005)

Hwang,  Joon Ho 황 준호,
초서의 모국어 문학관, 텍스트, 명성:  [명성의 전당]의 경우 (Vernacular Poetry, Text, and Fame in The  House of Fame)
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 12.2 (2004)
Korean
English Abstract

The House of Fame provides significant clues as to how Chaucer began to create his characteristic English poetry  since it helps us see what kind of poetry an immature poet Chaucer could create under the influence of strong foreign inheritance. Dante Alighieri's influence, in particular, was crucial in that he provided Chaucer with a vision of the potential for vernacular poetry and poetic innovation that made Chaucer's poetry different from not only that of his English precursors but also that of the great poets of the Continental tradition. In the House of Fame, Chaucer's struggle with the nonstandard forms of English and the lack of its literary tradition demonstrates how he desired to build his own authority and fame with the newly embarking Chaucerian poetics that reached its acme in the Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde.

An, Sonjae  (Brother Anthony)
Echoes of Boethius and Dante in Chaucer's Troilus and Cressida

Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 12.2 (2004)  393 - 418
English
English abstract
Scholars have identified over 30 points in Troilus and Criseyde where Chaucer is clearly translating directly from Dante’s Commedia. Yet he never indicates his debt or refers to Dante explicitly. The echoes of Dante’s text are particularly dense in the poem’s opening lines in Book 1, at the moment in Book 3 when Troilus and Criseyde acheive physical union, and above all in the closing section of Book 5. Close examination of these sections suggests that Chaucer was pursuing a deliberate, but hidden strategy that culminates in the final lines of the poem, by which Troilus’s trajectory is deliberately and constantly contrasted ironically with Dante’s. While Troilus and the poem’s narratorial voice identify the sexual union of Book 3 with achieved bliss, the Dantean references and Boethian elements invite a quite different reading. The references to Statius in Chaucer’s poem, in particular, cannot be fully understood without reference to the role he plays in Dante’s Commedia, as the archetype of the Christian poet confronting his religious and moral responsibilities in a pagan literary tradition. A brief survey of the echoes of Boethius’ Consolation in Troilus shows a similar strategy of indirect, ironic commentary on Troilus’ notions of happiness.


 Papers published in the more recent issues of Medieval and Early Modern English Studies (with links to abstracts and PDF full texts)

Volume 14 No. 1 (2006)

Kang, Jisoo (강지수)
강지수
, 기억의 판에 새겨진 아이네아스와 디도 이야기: 초서의 [명성의 전당] 독자 (The Story of Aeneas and Dido on the Tablet of Memory: The House of Fame and the Reader)
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 14 No. 1 (2006) pp33-56
Korean
[Abstract] PDF file of text


Volume 14 No. 2 (2006)

 Lee, Dongchoon (이동춘)
「시골유지의
이야기」(The Franklin’s Tale): 도덕적 이야기인가, 픽션인가? (The Franklin’s Tale: a Moral Tale or a Fiction?)
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies
Volume 14 No. 2 (2006) pp.265-300
Korean
[Abstract] PDF file of text

 
Volume 15 No. 2 (2007)

Lee, Noh Kyung (이노경
비극의
동인(動因): 트로일루스의 무기력 (Acedia as a Motive in Troilus' Tragedy)
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 15 No. 2 (2007) pp. 271 ~ 287
Korean
[Abstract] PDF file of text


Kim, Uirak (
김의락)
The Medieval Poetics of Pilgrimage and Multiple Voices 
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 15 No. 2 (2007) pp. 289-305
English
[Abstract] PDF file of text


Volume 16 No. 1 (2008)

Lee, Dongchoon (이동춘)
「기사의
이야기」: 형식(Forms), 부조화(Incongruities) 초서의 의도 (The Knight’s Tale: Forms, Incongruities, and Chaucer’s intention)
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 16 No. 1 (2008) pp. 43 ~ 76
Korean
[Abstract] PDF file of text


Kim, Hyonjin (김현진)
초서의
나약한 수소’: 「기사의 이야기」 다시 읽기  (Chaucer’s “Wayke Ox”: Rereading The Knight’s Tale)
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 16 No. 1 (2008) pp. 77 ~ 111

Korean

[Abstract] PDF file of text


Yoon, Minwoo (
윤민우)
그리젤다의
몸과 노동: 초서의 「학자의 이야기」 (Griselda’s Body and Labor in Chaucer’s Clerk’s Tale)
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 16 No. 1 pp. 113 ~ 141
Korean
[Abstract] PDF file of text 


 Volume 18 No. 1 (2010)

Cañadas, Ivan
The Shadow of Virgil and Augustus on Chaucer’s House of Fame  
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 18 No. 1 (2010) pp. 57~79 (23 pages) 
[Abstract] PDF file of text


 Volume 18 No. 2 (2010)

Volume 18 No. 2 Inchol Yoo,
The Politics of Chaucer"s Boece
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 18 No. 2 (2010) page(s): 361-384 (23 pages)
[Abstract] PDF file of text


Volume 19 No. 2 (2011)

Volume 19 no. 2 Inchol Yoo,
Challenging and Promoting Peace: - The Politics of Chaucer’s The Romaunt of the Rose
Medieval and Early Modern English Studies Volume 19 No. 2 (2011)   page(s): 139-163 (25 pages) [Abstract] PDF file of text

Sung-kyun Yim (임성균, )
“그대의 발자취” - 『선녀여왕』 제 4권과 초서
page(s): 165-186 (22 pages)
“The footing of thy feete”: Chaucer in Book 4 of The Faerie Queene)
[Abstract] PDF file of text


Volume 21 No.2 (2013)

Sunghyun Jang.
The Symbolism of the Pit in the Prioress’s Tale - Jewish-Christian Disputes over the Virgin Mary   page(s): 173-191       [Abstract]   PDF file of text
      
Hyunyang Lim (임현양)
일탈과 통제: 언어, 명예훼손, 그리고 초서의  『식품조달인의 이야기』  page(s): 193-214      [Abstract]   PDF file of text
  Transgression and Containment: Language, Defamation, and The Manciple’s Tale

Volume 22 No 1 (2014)

 Dongchoon Lee (이동춘)
축제의 제전(祭典)으로서 『캔터베리 이야기』- 「방앗간 주인의 이야기」를 중심으로   page(s): 21-47   [Abstract]   PDF file of text
        The Canterbury Tales in terms of a Road Festival as Reflected in The Miller’s Tale]


 3. Chaucer-related articles published in other Korean journals and publications

Choi, Yejung.
Body and Text in Chaucer's Man of Law's Tale
Feminist Studies in English Literature 10 (2002): 223-44
[Korean Society for Feminist Studies in English Literature]
 
The Man of Law's Tale is a good instance for examining the theoretical problems relating to the body and the text in medieval hermeneutics. This article attempts to show that the Man of Law's Tale enacts the uncontrollable signification of the text, revealing how textual transmission becomes a process of textual transgression.